St. Louis Gun Dealers “Selling Everything That’s Not Nailed Down”

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Gun dealers in the St. Louis area are doing booming business while the region awaits the verdict from the grand jury looking into the shooting death of Mike Brown:

Metro Shooting Supplies, in an area near the city’s main airport, reports selling two to three times more weapons than usual in recent weeks — an average of 30 to 50 guns each day — while the jury prepares to conclude its three-month review of the case that sparked looting and weeks of sometimes-violent protests in August.

“We’re selling everything that’s not nailed down,” owner Steven King said. “Police aren’t going to be able to protect every single individual. If you don’t prepare yourself and get ready for the worst, you have no one to blame but yourself.”

Other gun dealers say their sales spikes are comparable to the increases seen soon after Brown’s death on Aug. 9.

“I’ve probably sold more guns this past month than all of last year,” said County Guns owner Adam Weinstein, who fended off looters last summer at his storefront on West Florissant Avenue, the roadway that was the scene of many nightly protests. Weinstein stood guard over his business with an assault rifle and pistol.

The store has since moved out of Ferguson — in part because of concerns about potential further violence.

Many Missourians seem to be praying for the best, but preparing for the worst.

Let’s hope it’s the best.

St. Louis Gun Dealers “Selling Everything That’s Not Nailed Down”

Missouri Democrats Trust A Convicted Drug User and A Violent Former Gang Member With Guns More Than Hard Working Teachers

Armed-Teacher-Sign-555x414

The left in Missouri is apoplectic over the veto override of SB 656.  One Democratic legislator, convicted drug user Rep. Jeremy LaFaver, told The Missouri Times he was worried about guns in the classroom:

“The bill highlights the GOP’s hypocrisy,” Rep. Jeremy LaFaver (D-Kansas City) said. “They love big government when it means telling local governments what to do. This will backfire on them in November because moderate, suburban moms and dads know guns in kindergarten classrooms are a bad idea. The real question is how well will Democrats capitalize on their foolishness.”

Why are guns in the classroom a bad idea?

Let’s really look at that.  What are these hoplophobes afraid of?

The teachers carrying will be known by the school administration.

They will 112 hours of training, and an additional 12 hours annually.

They have to have background checks and get a permit from the government to carry concealed.

And they have to volunteer.  They have to want to do this.

So what’s to fear?

That they will leave a gun in a desk drawer for a student to find?

That they will shoot a kid accidentally?

That they are too irresponsible to trust with a gun around children?

That’s kind of insulting, isn’t it?  I mean, these are still teachers, the folks millions turn their children over to every morning.  They are respectable people with degrees, highly trained to be educators.

Suddenly they are incompetent, irresponsible boobs because they’re carrying?

LaFaver clearly thinks they can’t be trusted with a gun.  Many of his Democratic colleagues concur.

People like Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, who voted against SB 656 and opposed the veto override.

Sen. Nasheed is a former gang member with a violent past:

The real thuggery yesterday allegedly occurred far from stage, in a suite belonging to utility company, Ameren UE. That’s where State Representative Jamilah Nasheed (D – St. Louis) was mingling with invitees of the utility’s lobbyist when she says she ran into State Senator Maria Chapelle-Nadal (D – University City).

“I was trying to enjoy the concert, but she kept harassing me,” Chapelle-Nadal tells Daily RFT. “Finally she cornered me. I never said I would cut her throat, though I did mention a stabbing. I said that if I were really as unstable as she says I am, I would have stabbed someone by now, like the time she stabbed someone when she was with the ‘Switchblade Sistas’ — a high-school gang.”

Nasheed didn’t deny what Chappelle-Nadal said, but instead asked, “What the hell does that have to do with anything?”

Here’s another interesting fact about Nasheed.  If you see her in the capitol, it’s highly likely she’s strapped.

That’s right.  She’s carrying, and so are a lot of other people.

In fact, unless I missed a drug conviction somewhere, even Rep. LaFaver could get a permit and bring a gun to his office in Jefferson City.

And I didn’t hear any wailing and gnashing of teeth this year to restrict the ability to carry a concealed weapon at the State Capitol.

So, it appears Missouri Democrats trust violent gang bangers and convicted drug users with guns more than teachers.

Missouri Republicans apparently believe that the decision to become an educator doesn’t mean you surrender your right to defend yourself and those in your charge.

What do you believe?

Missouri Democrats Trust A Convicted Drug User and A Violent Former Gang Member With Guns More Than Hard Working Teachers

How the Second Amendment Kept One North County Business from Being Looted Last Night

Last night, looters pretty much had their way with Ferguson.

Except for St. Louis Ink Tattoo Studio, where Mike Gutierrez and a few of his friends exercised their Second Amendment rights and turned the crowd away.

From the River Front Times:

“We didn’t want them coming in here and then running around with a bunch of free guns,” Weinstein told Daily RFT when we arrive at the store around 12:30 a.m. this morning. Weinstein was outfitted with an assault rifle, pistol and tactical vest. Gutierrez cradled his own rifle in his hands.

Gutierrez, Weinstein and their group arrived to find thieves tearing through a Dollar General in the same strip mall that houses their business. Weinstein says the looters attempted moving toward the shop, but were scared off by the guns. Then the police arrived.

So many think, or want other, less educated Americans to think the Second Amendment is about hunting. “What do you need an assault rifle to hunt for, huh?”

Well, Thomas Jefferson knew it wasn’t all about hunting, nor was it all about resisting a tyrannical government.

Some of it was about the above, as he noted here:

Laws that forbid the carrying of arms…disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes…. Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man.” (Jefferson’s “Commonplace Book,” 1774-1776, quoting from On Crimes and Punishment, by criminologist Cesare Beccaria, 1764)

I can only assume those who would prohibit Gutierrez from owning his rifle would have preferred his store get looted.

If you want, you can ask Missouri’s resident outraged gun grabber if that’s her preference.

Hat Tip: Gateway Pundit

How the Second Amendment Kept One North County Business from Being Looted Last Night

Clear Anti-Gun Bias Shown in Kansas City Star Headline on Teacher’s Getting Range Training

On Friday, the Kansas City Star published a story on teachers in West Plains, Missouri attending range training. I didn’t see the story until today, but something stood out to me.

The headline:

Amid an epidemic of school shootings, some teachers are being trained to shoot back

See anything wrong with that?

You might miss it at first. It’s the idea that America is in the middle of a school shooting “epidemic.”

We aren’t:

“There is no pattern, there is no increase,” says criminologist James Allen Fox of Boston’s Northeastern University, who has been studying the subject since the 1980s, spurred by a rash of mass shootings in post offices.

MassShootings

The random mass shootings that get the most media attention are the rarest, Fox says. Most people who die of bullet wounds knew the identity of their killer.

Society moves on, he says, because of our ability to distance ourselves from the horror of the day, and because people believe that these tragedies are “one of the unfortunate prices we pay for our freedoms.”

Grant Duwe, a criminologist with the Minnesota Department of Corrections who has written a history of mass murders in America, said that while mass shootings rose between the 1960s and the 1990s, they actually dropped in the 2000s. And mass killings actually reached their peak in 1929, according to his data. He estimates that there were 32 in the 1980s, 42 in the 1990s and 26 in the first decade of the century.

Chances of being killed in a mass shooting, he says, are probably no greater than being struck by lightning.

Would anyone say we are in an epidemic of lightning strikes?

But that’s “mass shootings,” not school shootings, you say. There’s a difference, you say.

Here’re some more facts:

So how frequently are people killed at school? The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) keeps a running count of such homicides, with “at school” defined to include deaths not just on school property but “while the victim was on the way to or from regular sessions at school or while the victim was attending or traveling to or from an official school-sponsored event.” You might quibble about whether those off-campus killings belong in this category, but still, it’s a straightforward definition that doesn’t get bogged down in how many people die in one attack or, for that matter, what weapon was used to murder them.

As it happens, the bureau published a new report on school violence this month. Here is the relevant chart:

schoolviolence
With the caveat that with numbers this low it’s easy to be misled by random noise, I’ll point out that the figure has fallen. Note also that these are raw totals, not deaths per population. A chart of school homicide rates would show an even steeper decline.*

But has that decline come to an end? As you can see, the bureau’s figures only go through the 2010–11 school year, thus excluding the Sandy Hook massacre and everything since. Twenty children and six adults were murdered at Sandy Hook, making the event bloody enough to cause a spike in 2012–13 all by itself. We don’t have enough data to say for certain whether that year was an outlier like 2006–07 or the start of a new trend, but the authors do offer some tentative numbers for the period since the massacre. According to “preliminary counts from media reports,” they write, the U.S. saw “17 school-associated violent deaths between December 15, 2012, and November 14, 2013″—11 homicides and six suicides, with six of the dead being of student age.

This much is clear: If you’re wondering where kids are likely to die, the answer plainly isn’t a classroom. (Quoting the BJS report one more time: “During the 2010–11 school year, 11 of the 1,336 homicides among school-age youth ages 5–18 occurred at school.”) And in the period for which we have clear data, the school homicide rate moved in the same direction as the overall homicide rate: downward.

As I’ve pointed out, 80 percent of people won’t read past the headline. But if they do, they again find the anti-gun agenda in the text:

In the year and a half since the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary, as America has struggled to find the answer to its epidemic of school shootings, some districts have decided that teachers are the ultimate first responders and need to learn to shoot back.

Facts are stubborn things. We are not dealing with an epidemic, but a media that prioritizes sensationalism and politics over facts.

Clear Anti-Gun Bias Shown in Kansas City Star Headline on Teacher’s Getting Range Training

Liberals Hyperventilating Over MO Teachers Carrying Concealed Weapons in Schools, Ignore Real Danger

Missouri liberals are apoplectic over the idea that some teachers and administrators actually having the ability to defend themselves in case a deranged nutjob decides to shoot up a school.

This one I thought was going to break Twitter with her outrage:

Here’s one of my favorites:

I’m sorry, but what happened to the whole, “If it could save one child…” argument? Seems like this could stop 23 percent of mass shootings.

Another liberal, Aimee P, wrote a blog post about it:

My response?

Fact: kids are far more likely to die in a pool than by a gun:

According to the CDC, about 5 in every 100,000 children ages 1 to 14 die from accidental injuries every year. (This is a pretty low number in terms of lifetime risks; accidental deaths skyrocket when you hit the 15-19 age group.) Here are the top ten causes in chart form; I’ve included both the CDC’s number for guns and an adjusted number (double that):

You can see by looking at the X axis that guns do, indeed, move up several places in the rankings when you double the number. But you can see from the Y axis that gun accidents remain a rare cause of unintentional death for children. More than half of such deaths are from cars and water, and shuffling the rankings below fourth place doesn’t really change the overall picture.

From Freakonomics:

In a given year, there is one drowning of a child for every 11,000 residential pools in the United States. (In a country with 6 million pools, this means that roughly 550 children under the age of ten drown each year.) Meanwhile, there is 1 child killed by a gun for every 1 million-plus guns. (In a country with an estimated 200 million guns, this means that roughly 175 children under ten die each year from guns.) The likelihood of death by pool (1 in 11,000) versus death by gun (1 in 1 million-plus) isn’t even close: Molly is roughly 100 times more likely to die in a swimming accident at Imani’s house than in gunplay at Amy’s.

Save your liberal hysteria over guns until you ban all the swimming pools.  Until then, teachers and administrators should be free to defend themselves and their students.

Liberals Hyperventilating Over MO Teachers Carrying Concealed Weapons in Schools, Ignore Real Danger

Second Amendment Rally Scheduled for September 11th on State Capitol Front Lawn

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A rally for the Second Amendment is scheduled for September 11th on the front lawn of the state capitol. This is the day the General Assembly will be holding their veto session. It starts at 9 am, and confirmed speakers include:

  • 9:15 – Rep. Doug Funderburk
  • 9:30 – Rep. Chuck.Gatschenberger
  • 9:45 – Rep. Curtman
  • 10:00 –  Sen. Brian Nieves

According to the organizers,  Lt. Governor Peter Kinder, Speaker Tim Jones, Floor Majority Leader John Diehl, Senate President Pro Tem Tom Dempsey, Majority Floor Leader Ron Richard, and Senator Brian Munzlinger are all invited to speak.

HB 436 was vetoed by the Governor.

Organizers hope to hold a large enough rally to convince legislators to overturn that veto.

If you’re attending, RSVP at the event’s Facebook page.
Second Amendment Rally Scheduled for September 11th on State Capitol Front Lawn

NULLIFICATION: Missouri Legislature Passes Bill Declaring All Federal Gun Regulations Unenforceable

 

My kind of buffet.
My kind of buffet.

The Missouri Republicans in the House and Senate sent a clear message to DC regarding what they can do with their anti-gun agenda:

The Missouri Legislature sent the governor a bill Wednesday that would expand gun rights and declare all federal gun regulations unenforceable, in a response to President Obama’s push for gun control legislation.

The Republican-led Legislature passed the measure hoping to shield the state from federal proposals that would ban assault weapons and expand background checks. But the U.S. Senate’s defeat of a background check expansion three weeks ago did nothing to assuage the fears of Missouri Republicans who pressed forward with their legislation.

The Missouri House voted 118-36 Wednesday to send the bill to Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon. The Senate passed the measure earlier this month.

Opposition to the bill came strictly from the left.  From people like Rep. Stacey Newman (D-University City), who said,

“I don’t understand why this body continues to turn their back and ignore gun violence in order to increase access to weapons.”

Meanwhile, a random fact appears:

According to facts, gun related deaths in the United States dropped 39 percent in the last 20 years, from 18,253 to 11,101.

While gun deaths are dropping, gun sales are skyrocketing

I don’t understand why Democrats continue to turn their back on facts and ignore what’s happening in this country in order to limit my Second Amendment rights.

The question now is, with the House Democrats being against this, will Gov. Jay Nixon sign it into law?

What do you think?

NULLIFICATION: Missouri Legislature Passes Bill Declaring All Federal Gun Regulations Unenforceable